13 Amazing Alocasia Varieties You Will Love

13 Amazing Alocasia Varieties You Will Love

13 Amazing Alocasia Varieties You Will Love

A popular houseplant that is commonly called the “elephant ears” plant, the alocasia comes in many unique and adorable varieties. Although these tropical vibe plants come in many sizes and colors, alocasias all have these common characteristics:
  • they have broad, elongated leaves
  • they need bright light
  • they are a tuberous perennial
  • they are prized for their signature, showy leaves
The hardest part about owning one of these beauties is choosing from the nearly 80 alocasia types. So, we have gathered a list of the 13 amazing types of alocasia that you will love.
 

1. Amazonica

One of the popular types of Alocasia, the Amazonica, or the Polly, is characterized by a dark, glossy leaf with bold white veining. A cross of two other varieties, the Amazonica hybrid grows to up to 2 feet in height and the leaves can be up to 16 inches.

One of the popular types of Alocasia, the Amazonica, or the Polly, is characterized by a dark, glossy leaf with bold white veining. A cross of two other varieties, the Amazonica hybrid grows to up to 2 feet in height and the leaves can be up to 16 inches.

2. Black Velvet (reginula)

This beauty’s dark, soft leaves defy what is expected of a normal houseplant. Black Velvet’s charcoal hue means, too, that this delicate alocasia type cannot tolerate direct sunlight. Owners are rewarded with a stunning dark, rounded leaves about the size of a saucer with a creamy veining on top and a lush purple underside.

This beauty’s dark, soft leaves defy what is expected of a normal houseplant. Black Velvet’s charcoal hue means, too, that this delicate alocasia type cannot tolerate direct sunlight. Owners are rewarded with a stunning dark, rounded leaves about the size of a saucer with a creamy veining on top and a lush purple underside.

3. Giant Taro (macrorrhizos)

One of the largest types of alocasia, the Giant Taro leaves can grow to 3-6 feet in length and the overall plant can soar to as tall as 12 feet in height. While too big when totally grown, young plants are vigorous and can be planted in the ground when they outgrow their pots into planting zones 9-12. With their gigantic leaves and cheery bright green, monochromatic tone, the Giant Taro is one of the excellent alocasia types to add to a home.

One of the largest types of alocasia, the Giant Taro leaves can grow to 3-6 feet in length and the overall plant can soar to as tall as 12 feet in height. While too big when totally grown, young plants are vigorous and can be planted in the ground when they outgrow their pots into planting zones 9-12. With their gigantic leaves and cheery bright green, monochromatic tone, the Giant Taro is one of the excellent alocasia types to add to a home.

4. Hooded Dwarf (cucullata)

Also called Buddha’s Palm and the Chinese Taro, the Hooded Dwarf is one of the smaller alocasia types. Its heart-shaped leaves lay flat atop a thin stem, moving and “waving” with the slightest motion, giving it the unique monikers. The Hooded Dwarf leaves are shiny and bright green with yellow veining throughout. Their diminutive size and low light and water maintenance make these types of alocasia very popular as a houseplant.

Also called Buddha’s Palm and the Chinese Taro, the Hooded Dwarf is one of the smaller alocasia types. Its heart-shaped leaves lay flat atop a thin stem, moving and “waving” with the slightest motion, giving it the unique monikers. The Hooded Dwarf leaves are shiny and bright green with yellow veining throughout. Their diminutive size and low light and water maintenance make these types of alocasia very popular as a houseplant.

 

5. Ivory Coast

This hybrid’s lovely pink stems and deep green, arrow-shaped leaves make for a colorful houseplant. This very popular alocasia type has wavier leaves than many other varieties, and it also needs bright indirect light rather than the direct sun to be happy. Ivory Coast’s vibrant colors and hardiness as a houseplant make it a favorite variety to own.

This hybrid’s lovely pink stems and deep green, arrow-shaped leaves make for a colorful houseplant. This very popular alocasia type has wavier leaves than many other varieties, and it also needs bright indirect light rather than the direct sun to be happy. Ivory Coast’s vibrant colors and hardiness as a houseplant make it a favorite variety to own.

6. Kris (sanderiana)

Growing large in outdoor settings, the Kris is one of the perfect indoor alocasia types that just about anyone can cultivate and enjoy. With very wavy edges rimming the large leaves, the Kris plant is a softer-looking variety of alocasia. The deep, glossy green leaves also burst forth with creamy white flower inflorescence seasonally, adding to the charm of the Kris plant.

Growing large in outdoor settings, the Kris is one of the perfect indoor alocasia types that just about anyone can cultivate and enjoy. With very wavy edges rimming the large leaves, the Kris plant is a softer-looking variety of alocasia. The deep, glossy green leaves also burst forth with creamy white flower inflorescence seasonally, adding to the charm of the Kris plant.
 

7. Melo


This jade-green-leaved, small alocasia type has one caveat: it is toxic to pets and humans, so keep it out of the reach of little hands or paws. But its beautiful leaves and delicate snowy flowers make it a gorgeous houseplant that only needs very little water and indirect sunlight to maintain.
 

8. Morocco

With its dark green leaves, taller variety types of alocasia like Morocco can grow up to three feet tall. It needs plenty of indirect light and will even turn its leaves to all face the light source, but leaves will burn in direct sun.

With its dark green leaves, taller variety types of alocasia like Morocco can grow up to three feet tall. It needs plenty of indirect light and will even turn its leaves to all face the light source, but leaves will burn in direct sun.

We know that digging holes is a time-consuming procedure. To make planting easier, but also for a bunch of other purposes, you could use a garden auger to grow your Alocasia.

9. Red Secret (cuprea)


Named after the surprising red tone underneath the leaf, Red Secret’s leaves have an unusual, iridescent glowing appearance. The leaves are rounded and long, and it is known as a relatively slow grower.
 

10. Silver Dragon (banginda)

The exotic Silver Dragon’s velvety leaves are rounded but are white and green in color. They perch on sturdy pink-hued stems, giving the Silver Dragon a sought-after appearance for collectors of types of alocasia houseplants.

The exotic Silver Dragon’s velvety leaves are rounded but are white and green in color. They perch on sturdy pink-hued stems, giving the Silver Dragon a sought-after appearance for collectors of types of alocasia houseplants.

11. Triangular (triangularis)


With leaves more diamond-shaped, it’s easy to see how the Triangular alocasia got its name. Types of alocasia with ruffled edges of the leaves, like the Triangular, have a more delicate appearance than other varieties.

12. Wentii

A bronzy purple under the leaf characterizes the Wentii plant. Alocasia types like the Wentii also sport unusual red flowers, and the plant can be grown small or relatively large.

A bronzy purple under the leaf characterizes the Wentii plant. Alocasia types like the Wentii also sport unusual red flowers, and the plant can be grown small or relatively large.

13. Zebrina

This striped stunner has lanky, long stalks in alternating tones of black and yellow, like a zebra. The leaves, while still large and showy, have more of an arrow or shield shape than the more common elephant-ear or heart shape.

 This striped stunner has lanky, long stalks in alternating tones of black and yellow, like a zebra. The leaves, while still large and showy, have more of an arrow or shield shape than the more common elephant-ear or heart shape.